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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 28, 2017 2:00pm-3:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 2pm: the eu's lead negotiator says there's a new dynamic to brexit talks, but warns there's still work to be done. we managed to create clarity on some points, on others, however, more work remains to be done and we are not there yet. ryanair is threatened with legal action for misleading passengers about their rights — as thousands more flights are cancelled. the england cricketer ben stokes apologises, after video emerges, appearing to show him throwing punches in a brawl outside a nightclub. also in the next hour, theresa may staunchly defends the benefits of a free market economy. in a speech at the bank of england, the prime minister said capitalism's faults had to be addressed — but abandoning the system would be a backward step. and the founder of playboy magazine hugh hefner, described by some as a pioneer of sexual liberation, has died. he was 91. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. britain and europe say "decisive steps forward" have been made, in talks over brexit, but much more work still needs to be done. speaking after a fourth round of negotiations in brussels, the eu's michel barnier, and the brexit secretary david davis, agreed there was now more clarity surrounding their discussions, after what was described as a ‘new dynamic,‘ created by theresa may's speech on brexit, in florence last week. both david davis and the eu's main negotiator, michel barnier, describe this, the fourth round of negotiations, as vital. an eu summit‘s just three weeks away and britain had wanted the first phase of the negotiations to be completed by then. that's looking unlikely but mr davis
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insisted there had now been significant steps forward. when i look across the full ranges of issues to do with our withdrawal from the eu, i'm clear we have made considerable progress on the issues that matter, including certainty, citizens and visitors, providing reassurance to our eu partners in regards to our mutual and financial obligations and agreeing to some of the key principles in relation to issues arising from northern ireland and ireland. last week, theresa may gave a vital speech in florence about brexit. it was more conciliatory, it included an offer that britain would pay its dues to the european union, during a two—year transition period, that would follow our official departure in 2019 and her words seem to have had an impact. translation: i think that it is positive that theresa may's speech made it possible to unblock the situation, to some extent, and give
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a new dynamic to the situation but we're far from being at a stage, and it will take weeks or maybe even months, where we will be able to say, "yes, 0k, there has been sufficient progress on the principles of this orderl withdrawal." the first phase of these brexit talks is all about reaching agreement on three key issues: how much in total britain will pay to leave. the rights of eu citizens living here and british citizens in the other 27 states. and then the complex issue of the border between northern ireland and the republic. despite david davis's upbeat assessment, it's clear there are still very sharp differences between the two sides — and the clock is ticking fast towards our departure date of march, 2019. richard galpin, bbc news. chris morris is here. so for the
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first time, perhaps, some better mood music. the divorce bill, central to everything so far, some movement? a little. but the theresa may speech in florence did, it improved the mood. that is important. she did use the language that the eu wanted to hear. an element of choreography, in particular, honouring the financial commitments when we were a member. but it is not saying all of the commitments and today, david davis made it clear, that they are not prepared to say what they think the commitments are. that is a problem for the european union, as they feel burned on the issue of money, and david davis wants to move on to the future before deciding exactly how
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much and by what means we are to pgy- much and by what means we are to pay. michel barnier says, much and by what means we are to pay. michel barniersays, being frank, and then you pay attention, that there is no credible link between future relationship and the bills that we have to settle in the past there. is no possible link, he repeated it several times. so we have to find a creative way out of that. the money is around but it is how you present it and break that pa rt how you present it and break that part of the deadlock. soa part of the deadlock. so a little less nuance, perhaps. any change of citizens' rights? some. david davis talked about progress, there has been some incremental progress but on this issues, this is about people's real lives, so there was progress on social security payments. but there is an element in the room, that is the enforcement of citizens' rights.
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britain has made an offer to right any agreement into uk law, giving it direct effect, in the jarring owned again, michel barnier said this was again, michel barnier said this was a positive but yes, in the end, the european union wants the european court ofjustice to be the ultimate legal recourse and the uk is saying that they cannot say that. if there isa that they cannot say that. if there is a 10—year—old latvian, when they are going to in 60 years' time, to go to the european court ofjustice, half a century after we have left the eu? that is difficult to accept. and on the third situation, the irish and ireland border? we all know how important it is. we all know how important it is. we all know that there is the good friday agreement that must be protogethered, the common travel area. there is lots of goodwill about how to do it but the problem
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is, and the uk has a solid argument, is, and the uk has a solid argument, is how to decide on the irish border without talking about the future issue, for example, howian you decide how the border is to work if you don't know the customs arrangements are in place? so that isa arrangements are in place? so that is a reason that mr davis wants to argue to look into the future. he spoke about transition, he said he wa nted spoke about transition, he said he wanted to focus on the future and once michel barnier gets a mandate to talk about transition, which he has not, perhaps then they can do that. so there are steps being made in the right direction, now, perhaps at the summit of the 69eu leaders next month, that there can be talk on the transitional period. the hope is that the negotiations will be further tan they are? and the
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british spatial that we have shown flexibility and you could argue we have made concession but the language is that we have shown flexibility. they would like flexibility. they would like flexibility in response from the eeu's side but michel barnier has a fairly scripted mandate. it is delivered to him by the leaders of the other 27 countries, so it is difficult for him to step far beyond that. as long as this is the case and the eu is saying we are the ones leave, upsetting the apple cart, that the onus is on us to make the changes, that will be difficult. but at least this week, the negotiation time had fallen off the rails, which a couple of weeks ago, it was more ofa a couple of weeks ago, it was more of a possibility. we can now speak to the labour mp and chair of the commons brexit select committee, hilary benn. he's in our westminster studio. there was a change in the mood, that is important? it is. there is no
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doubt that the atmosphere was improved by the speech that the prime minister gave in florence. but it has not broken the log jam. that is important. indeed for the future of the negotiations, michel barnier, in his comments today, made it clear that he doesn't think that sufficient progress has been made. u nless sufficient progress has been made. unless and until the negotiationors are able to get on to part two of the talk, which is the future relationship, as chris morris was rightly saying, you will not be able to sort out the problem of northern ireland, as how will you end up with a deal that is different between dublin and belfast, as opposed to dover and calais, and crucially, on the question of transitional arrangements, businesses will not know for certain that they are to happen, and secondly, what they will consist it. what the prime minister did, belatedly, and a lot of time has been lost because of the election, because the government has
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been arguing amongst itself about the position it wants to adopt in the position it wants to adopt in the talks, all she has done is to say a is that she would like to ask formerly for transitional arrangement but the european union has to respond. but the business of the importance of the transitional arrangement, if we don't know what they will consist of and know for sure that they are to happen, then we have to take decisions to protect our businesses against the worth possible outcome, which is no deal. so time is of the essence and as we know the clock goes on ticking. that word, negotiation, looking at what is going on at the moment, there are those that feel that the only side that is compromising is the uk is that the eu has its position and is waiting for the uk to come round to their point of view? i think, in
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to come round to their point of view? ithink, in truth to come round to their point of view? i think, in truth that rereflects the situation itself. the uk is the one that has decided to leave, and the eu negotiators, michel barnier, the european council, have made it clear it is for us to propose how we suggest that we might deal with this, what kind of future relationship we want, i think one of the difficulties has been a lack of clarity on part of the uk government about what it was vehicling and that has led the european negotiations to say that they are not clear about what we are looking for and time has been wasted in this process, which is of the utmost urgency. in the end it is a political negotiation, i can understand why the british government is saying a final decision on the money, we would like to keep until we know what they are prepared to offer on the hugely important question of trade and market access, and all of the other questions that remain in people's
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minds from the practical ones, will european driving licences be recognised after we leaf, what happens to health treatment when we are on holiday in the european union, and flights, all of these questions must be sorted. the reason why the transitional arrangements we re why the transitional arrangements were so important, that the select committee said early on that we will need them, is that it buys us time. and we are running out of time. so the log jam must be broken to get on to pa rt the log jam must be broken to get on to part two of the negotiations. i hope to do that as quickly as possible and the eu negotiationors will show their flexibility to say fairenough, we will show their flexibility to say fair enough, we cannot work on all of the divorce situations, without talking about what some of the others will be. and the european courts ofjustice and its role, the eu is not going to
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budge on this, will it?” and its role, the eu is not going to budge on this, will it? i don't know. if there is flexibility and will, you can come up with a solution, one thing that the british government could do is to say as a sovereign country once we have left is we will take if you account of or give due weight to or advise courts that they should take on board decisions of the european court of justice that have relevance to the rights of the i citizens in the future, the alternative approach, which we may have to have for a lot of these questions, because in any agreement, once negotiated, there will be questions of interpretation and implementation, and i think we will have to establish some kind of hybrid court to involve the european court ofjustice hybrid court to involve the european court of justice and hybrid court to involve the european court ofjustice and our own supreme court, to which all of the matters will be referred. it was a step
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forward that the government announced that the rights would be enshrined in the legal agreement, which would then be implemented in our court. in the end, it is a philosophical difference rather than a practical one. and if we can't sort out the question of the 1.2 million brits in the 27 member states and the 3 million europeans living and working and paying tax here, it does not bode well for the rest of the complex negotiations. hilary benn, thank you very much for your time this afternoon. there has been a statement from the chief constable for avonen and somerset, following the incident near the m5 where a man was shot by police in marked and unmarked police cars, the statement is talking about the difficulties it caused in terms of traffic. but it starts by saying that their thoughts are with the family of the man who died and all of those affected by the incident.
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they say that a full investigation is under way, which is standard procedure. it goes on to say, that the port by road is still closed, there is a detailed search of the area to ensure that they have ca ptu red area to ensure that they have captured all of the evidence. they are very much aware of the disruption and know of the problem this is causing for the people that live in the local community and their frustrations. they say that their frustrations. they say that their own police and fire staff have been affected by the congestion, the ipc must run its course but they have impressed on them the need to open the road as soon as possible. they are grateful to the local people for their patience and understanding so far. so that is basically apologising to the community for the continued road closures as a result. more on that later on.
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you are watching bbc news. ryanair is being threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers, about their rights. the move by the uk's air regulator follows the cancellation of thousands more flights, affecting travellers through the christmas period, and well into march next year. the civil aviation authority says it's launched "enforcement action," which is a first step towards a law suit. ryanair‘s problems are due to a shortage of pilots, because of annual leave commitments. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. ryanair has already annoyed hundreds of thousands of passengers by cancelling their flights. now the head of the civil aviation authority says he is furious with the airline as well. the company he says has been misleading its customers about their rights. consumers shouldn't have to choose between low—cost fares and their legal rights and that at the moment seems to be what ryanair is saying. you can either have cheap fares or your legal entitlement. under eu law, if yourflight is cancelled your airline is to offer you a seat on another service and if it doesn't have another appropriate service itself, it has to book you with another carrier. it seems ryanair is only offering
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seats on its own aircraft and for some passengers that isn't appropriate. since the caa made its complaint, we have been contacted by some passengers. matthew rice said for example he had been asking specifically for a seat on another carrier's service. he said over web chat, "you are obligated to re—route me..." and the response he got was no, i am not. ryanair insists it complies fully with the law and has reminded its customer service agents about passengers right. about passengers' right. it says it is talking to the caa. simon calder thinks that the situation is unprecedented. simon calder thinks that the situation is unprecedented. for the aviation regulator to reprimand ryanair for misleading the public on an industrial scale is simply unheard—of, and i think it is going to do a lot of significant damage
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to the airline. ryanair has cancelled 20,000 flights so far, some 700,000 people have been affected and travellers like these people in edinburgh seem increasingly unimpressed. i feel sorry for the people that use ryanair really, and it is really quite bad for them. it will lose a lot of business, that is definite. it isjust crazy, isn't it? how can they be so disorganised? it is ridiculous. they have made a bit of a mess, haven't they? a bit of a catastrophe for them. if ryanair doesn't do what the caa is asking, it could face heavy fines but there is also its reputation to think of. the question now is whether low fares can compensate for any damage done to its brand. there is a new dynamic to brexit
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talks about there is more work to be done. ryanair and talks about there is more work to be done. rya nair and thousands talks about there is more work to be done. ryanair and thousands more flights are cancelled. theresa may staunchly defenced the free market, warning of a risk to returning to what she called failed ideaologies. the england cricket vice captain, ben stokes, has apologised, after a video emerged appearing to show him throwing punches outside an english nightclub in the early hours of monday uk time. england football have named the scout for the final world cup qualifiers, the first time that manchester city's fabian delph has been included. and richard parker has stood down from the bobsleigh team and extra resources mea ns from the bobsleigh team and extra resources means that a women's team will be partially funded for a
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winter olympics next february. i'm back with a full update in 15 minutes'. two far right groups have been banned by the home office as terrorist organisations. scottish dawn and ns 1—3—1 are aliases of the neo—nazi group national action, which was banned last year. the home secretary amber rudd said the groups were vile, racist, homophobic and anti—semitic. joining me now is our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. what has happened? the home secretary has said that the groups should be banned from tomorrow. so people belonging to the group, encouraging others to support them, taking part in or arranging events organised by the group will be a criminal offence with the maximum penalty up to ten years in prison. 0nly penalty up to ten years in prison. only one has been band under
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anti—terror laws is a fright group, thatis anti—terror laws is a fright group, that is national action, and and that is national action, and and that was banned in december. the home office believe that ns 1—3—1 and scottish dawn are aliases of that group, national action. i'm looking at the website of scottish dawn. it is still up and running? the ban is not in place until tomorrow. it says a new social movement, it talks about the state, the state that we live in where our own people are taxed and bled on the alter of the so—called refugee, and it says where the oilland resources are owned exclusively by foreigners. that is some of the milder comments by scottish dawn. ns 1—3—1, their website has photographs of a banner of commemorating the death of
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rudolph hess, the former nazi leader who died in 1987. the banner was unpurled last month commemorating his death. that gives a flavour of where they position themselves. the home secretary said today that by extending the prescription of national action they are halting the spread of a poisonous ideology, stopping its membership growing protecting those at risk from extremism. with the news today it seems odd that they are still there? the news has just that they are still there? the news hasjust come that they are still there? the news has just come through in the last hour it could be within the next few hours that the website will be taken down, certainly by tomorrow. yesterday there was report on a number of arrests but that is not linked to what is happen happening
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today? it is not linked but a part of the stepping of investigations into national action. we learned yesterday as a part of a coordinated series that 11 men, aged between 22 and 35 were build held under the terrorism act, six about preparing a cts terrorism act, six about preparing acts of terrorism. all of them suspected to be belonging to national action. we await developments on that case. thank you very much. the england cricket vice captain, ben stokes, has apologised, after video emerged appearing to show him throwing punches outside a nightclub in bristol in the early hours of monday. the england cricket authorities have begun disciplinary procedures but say they will wait for the outcome of a police investigation before deciding what action to take. stokes was arrested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. he was detained overnight, then released while investigations continue. you may find some of the images in katie gornall‘s report disturbing. a night that spiralled out of control. this video allegedly shows england's vice captain ben stokes, here in a green t—shirt, involved in a street fight.
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the footage, published by the sun newspaper, has not been verified by the bbc but claims to show the cricketer brawling outside a nightclub in bristol in the early hours of monday morning. stokes was arrested after visiting the nightclub in bristol, the city where hours earlier england had played a one—day international. he was held on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm and released under investigation. today stokes were said to be fragile and today stokes was said to be fragile and devastated following his arrest and has apologised to the england and wales cricket board. clearly there needs to be a punishment. we need to know the full facts of what went on that night. he shouldn't have been in that position. i don't think being out at 2:30am on a monday morning is the right thing to be
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seen doing during the series. he has got to be the one who changes his lifestyle away from the cricket field. we want ben stokes the cricketer we have seen on the field over the last few years, we don't want that to change but we need him to change off the field. in december 2011 stokes was cautioned after obstructing a police officer during a night out in newcastle. two years later he was sent home from the lions tour in australia for repeated late night drinking, and in march 2014 he broke his hand after punching a locker. 0n the field, stokes is regarded as england's best all—rounder, the player australia would fear most ahead of ashes series. but this morning members of the ecb board discussed disciplinary action and reviewed the video footage from the sun. with his immediate future in the hands of cricket authorities and the police, his ashes dream seems long way off. the founder of playboy magazine,
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hugh hefner, has died. he was 91. at its peak it sold seven million copies a month, and hugh hefner at its peak playboy sold seven million copies a month, and hugh hefner described himself as a pioneer of sexual liberation. 0ur los angeles correspondentjames cook looks back at his life. mr hefner, i suppose you're the world's most famous hedonist. certainly in a very public way. are you a happy man? oh, yes. hugh hefner was the teenage boy who never grew up. a pioneer of 60s sexual liberation. bunny girls, nightclubs, a corporatejet called big bunny, all made possible by the magazine he started at his kitchen table. with marilyn monroe as its first nude centrefold, playboy was an instant hit. in its heyday it sold 7 million copies a month. what i fought for was personal, individual freedom. it is the unpopular views and values, these are the things which need protecting. and i have been vigorous in fighting
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for that from the very beginning. i think that i take the greatest pride in, it's been almost 50 years now, and i take the greatest pride in the impact that i think i personally and playboy has had on changing socio—sexual values of our time. he was attacked by both conservatives and feminists who accused him of reducing women to sexual toys. he claimed to have been a feminist before there was even such a thing as feminism. which is, i mean, hilarious in some ways but he really did set about trying to co—opt feminism into a movement that suited him and suited men in general. when sales dwindled hugh hefner retired to his mansion where the partying continued. at the age of 86, he married his third wife, crystal harris, a playboy playmate 60 years hisjunior. but he was not, he insisted, a dirty old man. i have dealt over the years with racism, with sexism.
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now it's ageism. i think that age disparity is something, more dramatic age disparity is something which is new because, you know a few years ago we were just living to be 50, 60 years old. we have to accommodate and rethink some of our prejudices and perceptions. he died at the playboy mansion in la, surrounded by friends, the self—styled godfather of the sexual revolution. hugh hefner who has died aged 91. time for a look at the weather. it should not be so bad this afternoon for the greater part of
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the british isles but it may not have started that way, there was a weather surge on the eastern shores and towards northern ireland and scotland. elsewhere, a bit of sunshine this afternoon. not so much breeze. highs of 20 or 21 celsius. but the next set of weather fronts are showing their hand towards northern ireland. cloudy, wet and windy there. and spread into the west of the british isles, to get on to the wee small hours of friday. but not a cold night. but an unpleasant combination of cloud, wind and rain, pushing east over friday. with showers, and brighter skies following into the western parts as we get on through the afternoon with a high, well, again, if you are lucky about the upper teens or so, somebody could get to 20 celsius. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the eu's top brexit negotiator, michel barnier, says there's still much to do but progress has been made during the latest round of talks with david davis in brussels.
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we managed to create clarity on some points. 0n others, however, more work remains to be done. and we are not there yet. i believe that banks to the constructive and determined manner in which both sides have conducted these negotiations we are making decisive steps forward. ryanair has been threatened with legal action from the civil aviation authority — for "persistently misleading" passengers about their rights — after they announced further flight cancellations yesterday. and england all—rounder ben stokes is said to be "fragile and devastated" and has apologised to cricket chiefs after his arrest on suspicion of assault. and in a speech at the bank of england, theresa may defends the benefits of a free market economy. she said capitalism's faults need to be addressed — but abandoning the system would be a backward step. time for the sport. we go to the bbc
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sports centre and 0lly foster. england have started their own disciplinary procedures after ben stokes' arrest under suspicion of causing actual bodily harm after a brawl outside a bristol nightclub. a video has been acquired by the sun that appears to show the fight in the early hours of monday morning. we haven't independently verified the video, and just to warn you before we show it, it is graphic. it appears to show stokes repeatedly throwing punches towards two men. we know that one man needed to go to hospital for treatment with facial injuries. stokes also suffered a minor fracture in his hand on the night of the incident. stokes was named in the ashes squad yesterday and he has retained the vice—captaincy. no charges have been brought, as the police investigation continues. he has apologised to the ecb and he is said to be devastated and in a fragile state. and aware of the
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magnitude of what has happened. for stokes personally he will be devastated, he knows he was in the wrong and in the wrong place. i think if stokes misses the ashes, with the hand industry or the criminal investigation is ongoing and he can't go to australia, i don't give england any chance of doing anything in the ashes series. he that important to the team. the make—up of the side is pretty much around ben stokes because of the all—round quality. he offers expertise with the bat, the ball, in the field, and with his persona, so ididn't give the field, and with his persona, so i didn't give england any chance at all in australia without ben stokes. in football, england have named their squad for their matches against slovenia. fabian delph features in the gareth southgate squad for the first time. he's got
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nine caps but won the last of them almost two years ago. the 26 man squad, nathaniel chalobah, danny welbeck, tom heaton, all out injured, as isjamie welbeck, tom heaton, all out injured, as is jamie vardy, who's been managing a hip problem. dele alli is in that squad but may face fifa action, after an obscene gesture that he made in the last match. he claimed it was a joke with a team—mate, but fifa are going to decide whether he should serve any punishment. chris coleman has named his wales squad ahead of their final world cup qualifiers against georgia and the republic of ireland. they are second in the group by a point, which is where they need to finish to have any chance of reaching the play—offs. arsenal's aaron ramsey is set to win his 50th cap for wales — he starred at last year's european championship when they reached the semifinals in their first appearance in the tournament. there are also call—ups for the uncapped sheffield united winger david brooks and the preston goalkeeper chris maxwell. five months before the winter olympics, british bobsleigh chief executive richard parker has stood down.
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this follows the departure of both the performance director and the head coach. there have been allegations of racism and bullying within the organisation and in the past few weeks, after what was described as an overspend, all funding withdrawn from the women's team. parker won't be replaced and with the resources that has freed up, as well as other restructuring, british bobsleigh say they can now partially fund a women's team in their bid to qualify for the pyeongchang games in february. tiger woods is a humane and never play competitive golf again. —— says he may never play competitive golf again. he underwent back surgery for again. he underwent back surgery for a fourth time in april. the 41—year—old hasn't played a major for the past two years. i've been out of the game for a while. first things first, get my health
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organised, make sure the pain goes away. could you see a scenario where you would not come back to competitive golf? yeah, definitely. i don't know what my future holds for me. i'm hitting 60 yard shots. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. let's get more now on our main story, and ryanair facing possible legal action from the civil aviation authority, who have accused the irish airline of ‘persistently misleading' passengers about their rights following thousands of flight cancellations. let's speak now to coby benson, who is a flight delay compensation solicitor at the law firm, bott and co. he's in our salford studio. good afternoon. good afternoon. for the civil aviation authority to display such anger would suggest that a lot of customers are unhappy. i'm guessing that a lot of customers are unhappy. i'm guessing you've had quite a few of them on the phone yourself? we absolutely have, yeah, notjust the last couple of days but the last few weeks as a result of all the
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cancellations. i think the frustration with the civil aviation authority is over the fact that the law is so clear—cut and yet ryanair, for some reason, choose on doing it their own way. we've been asking people if they'd got any questions. there are a couple here. this is from duncan. my flight from edinburgh to brussels was cancelled last sunday. i got the e—mail monday evening, six days before. it was a nightmare because i was going to a wedding. the only recent flight i could get was ake about —— klm light. it was offered a flight with ryanair three days light. it was offered a flight with rya nair three days later. light. it was offered a flight with ryanair three days later. he's wondering if you can claim compensation for the klm flight. yes, absolutely. it depends on the time he arrives at its final destination the new klm flight. year if he arrives more than two hours later you'll be entitled to compensation for ryanair. there shouldn't be any dispute over that. the more contentious point is whether or not he's entitled to have the klm flight paid for as well. at
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the klm flight paid for as well. at the moment ryanair are saying they'll only pay for flights with their own layer line where is the law is clear they should also be paying for his new klm flight he's had the book just paying for his new klm flight he's had the bookjust six days before the event. it's as cut and dried as that, is it? yes, it's black and white, no grey area. unless you work for ryanair, white, no grey area. unless you work for rya nair, because white, no grey area. unless you work for ryanair, because people are going back to the airline and they are saying no, you was entitled to that. you are quite right. the civil aviation authority have looked into it and aviation authority have looked into itand are aviation authority have looked into it and are of the opinion this is cut and dried. there should be no dispute over this. that's why they're acting so fast and taking such strong action against them. matt johnson and says my wife and i were faced with this debacle, on a long weekend to bordeaux. we flew out on thursday but on friday we were told our return flight was cancelled for sunday. their phones were jammed, there were no direct flights back, there were no direct flights back, the cost of flights was very expensive and we didn't trust
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ryanair to pay expensive and we didn't trust rya nair to pay refunds expensive and we didn't trust ryanair to pay refunds so we booked on easyjet flight and returned on tuesday. can they claim for the easyj et tuesday. can they claim for the easyjet flight? absolutely, the same again. this will happen again and again. this will happen again and again. they arejust again. this will happen again and again. they are just two people out of hundreds of thousands of people who are going to be faced with this same dilemma now. they had a flight booked, all the arrangements in place, many of those will still want to carry out those arrangements. they will still want to fly to their destination and they are looking for a replacement flights. the law is clear, if an airline is going to cancel the flight that was previously arranged they have to put that passenger on a replacement form of transport. it doesn't have to be a flight, it could be a ferry or train, if that confers the same goal. matt goes on, we are getting an impression from articles we should also have payment for our accommodation because our flight was delayed. i'm not sure if that's correct. we haven't been requesting a refund, perhaps you could find out for us. the accommodation issue, are they entitled to claim for that if they entitled to claim for that if they are delayed more than two days?
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yeah, the research is correct. ryanairare yeah, the research is correct. ryanair are responsible for certain expenses whilst the passengers waiting for the replacement flight. absolutely, hotels qualify for that. 0ther absolutely, hotels qualify for that. other examples are transport to and from the airport because they might have to go back to the airport are going now for a replacement flight and that can be expensive, and also the food and drink they are going to have to pay for whilst waiting for the replacement flight. all of that u nfortu nately falls for rya na ir to pat’- u nfortu nately falls for rya na ir to pay. justin has treated me, is their legislation on how quickly they have to process compensation and refunds? seven days and counting, this person says. the refund is supposed to be replaced within seven days. and fortu nately replaced within seven days. and fortunately with the compensation they don't stipulate when it needs to be paid. there is no clear—cut law. however we tend to advise clients they should wait a reasonable amount of time, which could be a few weeks, certainly no more than a month, and if nothing happens then they are perfectly entitled to take ryanair to my michael 0'leary on
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twitter and haven't had a response. asking if he had a question for you. it might be along the lines of how much can i get away with? yeah, with the passengers they had to ensure they are only claiming that what is reasonable, so they have a duty to ensure that they are not staying in 5—star hotels for instance when they could be staying in more ordinary accommodation, if that's what they we re accommodation, if that's what they were used to. the same goes with the food and drink they have to pay for. it has to be reasonable and necessary. at the moment the cia have expressed anger and in very strong terms but nothing more. what sanctions are open to the authorities? because we're talking about 400,000 people affected by the latest announcement of cancellations. yeah, ultimately the civil aviation authority have a lot of power. to begin with they'll be trying to talk to ryanair and encourage them to comply with the regulation. they'll be asking ryanair to make
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regulation. they'll be asking ryanairto make an regulation. they'll be asking ryanair to make an undertaking to give them a promise, effectively, that they'll be complying with the eu regulations but your question is what if they don't do that. the a nswer what if they don't do that. the answer is very simple. the cia have the power to fine ryanair erupted £5,000 per breach of the regulation. per breach? yeah per breach, so we're talking about 500,000 soldiers, that could be an enormous sum of money. would it be possible to get a class action together of all those customers? is that something ryanair something would be afraid of —— is that something ryanair would be afraid of? yeah, the £5,000 is a criminal rather than a civil matter, but passengers can clu b a civil matter, but passengers can club together to get the compensation. it's likely ryanair will be paying that, i understand they've admitted that already. thank you for clearing up that, coby benson. the prime minister has spoken about
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the benefits of the free market economy. theresa may acknowledged the problems caused by globalisation but insisted it was the only route to improve living standards for all, as our political correspondent chris mason reports. it's nicknamed the old lady of threadneedle street, the bank of england, founded over 300 years ago this is where 40 years ago theresa may started her career. she returned here this morning with a big picture message about her instincts on managing the economy. a free-market economy operating under the right rules and regulations is the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. it was the new combination which led societies out of darkness and stagnation and into the light of the modern age. what a contrast with yesterday, for
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after the singing at labour's conference, a pitch to run the economy radically different differently. there's a crisis of legitimacy in the capitalist system. now is a time government took a more active role in restructuring our economy. now is the time that we developed a new model of economic management. to replace the failed dogmas of neoliberalism. let's pick what the two party leaders are getting at here. the question is how much should the government be involved in running our economy? should ministers control the rent we pay all the company that provides our water? the gap between labour and the conservatives on these big questions has not been this wide in a generation. people used to grumble that politicians all sounded the same. you don't hear that much now. this is the city of london, the beating heart of the economy, or
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illustrators of its worst excesses depending on your view. the prime minister claims hers is a balanced approach, encouraging businesses to flourish and recognising some feel left behind. but the very fact she's making this argument now shows labour's ability to make the political weather. and her need to respond. my argument has always been that if you want to preserve and improve a system which has delivered unparalleled benefits, you have to ta ke unparalleled benefits, you have to take seriously its faults and do all you can to address them. not to do so would put everything we have achieved together as a country at risk. it would lead to a wider loss of faith in free markets and risk a return to the failed ideologies of the past. and expect mrs may to make this same place at the conservative conference, starting this weekend. chris mason, bbc news. at least 13
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ranger refugees have fled to have drowned when their boat collapsed off bangladesh. there's been a violent crackdown in myanmar‘s rakhine state. un officials had planned to visit rakhine today, but they say the government has blocked they say the government has blocked the visit. sanjoy majumder is on the border with myanmar and sent this report. the army e they= . heel» to ‘ ;i%’ buti ‘;i% challenging. "amen; raining and mg and w: ’ see and w: ’ ‘and.ee actually, some of mud everywhere. actually, some of the aid agencies have provided some umbrellas for them to get a bit of shelter. what's happening new arrivals are being registered and an aid truck at the far end from where they are able to receive some relief supplies. the whole point is for the
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army to take control of what had been until now a very chaotic aid operation. the concern for the international aid agencies is there hasn't been enough attention paid by the international community. the american ambassador to bangladesh has been here this morning to get a sense for herself of the increasing crisis. the hope from the aid agencies is that with more international attention coming here, perhaps more aid will start flowing through because the fact of the matter is that only a third of the $77 million pledged initially has come in. not much is flowing in. the situation here, as well as across in myanmar‘s mick dean state is desperate. —— rakhine state is desperate. the eu's leave negotiator says there's a new dynamic to brexit talks but once they're still work to
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be done. ryanair is threatened with legal action for misleading passengers about their rights, as thousands more flights are cancelled. theresa may staunchly defends the free—market, warning of the risk of a return to what calls failed ideologies. with 18 months to go until the uk officially leaves the eu, bbc news is looking at the central aspects of brexit over the coming months, starting with travel and trade. let's go live to our business presenter susannah streeterm, who's at the london gateway for us. hello. this really is a mega fort, open four years ago. it stands three square miles on the thames estuary. it has the tallest cranes in the world and they've been constructed and build the service the longest container ships in the world, which could be the length of four football pitches and carry 21,000 containers.
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it's a huge operation here. of course brexit is going to have massive implications for the way the uk imports and exports goods. business owners who trade with europe are concerned about how the prospect of tariffs and losing frictionless borders will affect their day to day operations. in a moment we'll get the position in hull, one of the biggest ports which deals with trade from the eu, but first to alastair fee, who looks at the more global outlook, from southampton. the port of southampton handles around 14 million tonnes of cargo each year. and supports 15,000 jobs. the vast majority of business, that's goods coming in and going out, is trade with countries outside of the eu. that gives companies based here a unique perspective on brexit. we're not dealing with intra— eu trades, we're dealing with ships coming deep sea from the far east, the americas, india pakistan, so our trades here are not
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essentially european trades. so we are sheltered from those impacts. their confidence is borne out by a boom in another direction of travel. this is the uk's number one port for exports. and that, for the most part, means cars. nowhere in the country handles more vehicles. hundreds of thousands pass through here every year. over 95% of the units handled here are going outside the eu, so it's really an exciting time. really, there's nothing anticipated right now on the table where we see it's going to be a major impact for us, our markets, the markets that we are dealing with. but expansion elsewhere at the port tells a different story that's more vulnerable to brexit. i'd like them to leave everything as it is. frictionless borders, the same tariff systems and free movement of goods. this customs warehouse sends goods to europe that for now enjoy free passage with no further duties paid.
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ijust can't see how you can end up in a system that would work if every single thing that was sent out of here had to be imported again into france. like elsewhere, there are unanswered questions about the potential for disruption and delays. but southampton's focus on export and its relationships outside of the eu means that for now, this port enjoys more certainty than most. there are automated stacking cranes, robot cranes, that are working here on the quayside to ensure the goods get the shots. between them, these routes can handle 800 lorries and containers every day. no routine customs inspections means no time lost at either end. that's critical for logistics businesses. like this hessle—based firm which doesn't want any extra customs checks after brexit. our customers' goods need to be
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delivered on time, in full. so if there is any delay, it's going to affect us both on our import and export. it would be additional costs to us, and we would have to pass those onto our customers. this company is already preparing for more bureaucracy, though, and says it can cope. others think technology at ports and on ferries could keep things moving. whether it's numberplate recognition systems, or whether they'll have some sort of fingerprinting system for the drivers, so that they can do, before the ferry actually docks, the checks have all been done. the organisation that represents shipping companies agrees with the uk government's proposal for a transition period towards a new streamlined customs arrangement, but says ports and their customers need enough time to prepare. it is possible that there might be technological solutions, and we'd like to see government invest more in things like access to ports, widening roads and improving rail links. but frankly, we cannot begin to talk about how long a transitional
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arrangement would be until we know what we are transitioning towards. the government now hopes to convince the eu to allow the kind of frictionless trade these businesses need to keep costs down and goods moving after brexit. in to ensure that goods get from ship to shore and then onto final destinations, here at this port, a lot of operations are now automated. we have automatic stacking cranes that are essentially robot cranes programmes by computer. the whole idea is that the process is seamless, to ensure that goods get in the shops here just in time. could this change post—brexit? let's chat the william bain, an adviser for the british g
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chat the william bain, an adviser for the british if finis“: . for the british retail—consortim do you fear there could be extra checks and inspections on eu goods in the same way as there are already here for non—eu goods, and what impact could that have on the supply chain? the afternoon, yes, that is the fear. the minute the uk becomes a third country and if we don't have a third country and if we don't have a strong transitional deal followed bya a strong transitional deal followed by a really strong is and the amount 2.2. could increase. "7" f of food waste could increase. it could be a very bad situation for businesses and for consumers. dp world, which runs this site, says its underca pacity. they world, which runs this site, says its undercapacity. they have three huge deep berths for these container
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ships, they could have six, there is capacity for more eu goods to come here and for those checks to be carried out. what about other ports? is what we want, with having tariff free and regulation free trade, but the problem is that hmrc have said the problem is that hmrc have said the amount of customs declarations is set to increase fivefold if we have a weak deal on brexit and it's also about the practicalities these checks opening up lorries, opening up checks opening up lorries, opening up consignments, heating consignments. the ports do not have the capacity for the scale of the checks that would be required if we provide a weak deal on brexit. this port says it does have the capacity. good what will happen is ports like dover, for example, that don't have capacity, will lose business here? the brc has encouraged the government to invest in dover and other ports, but it's also about the road infrastructure, it's about the new it systems that are coming on
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strea m new it systems that are coming on stream just two months before brexit is going to happen and there are doubts about that. we need to make sure the infrastructure in its entirety is in place and we have zero tariff trade and as few regulations as possible, which would add delays and extra costs to customs procedures. this two year transition period has been mooted. that's what theresa may has asked for. it's what she says she will negotiate. will that be enough time to set all of this up? the brc has recommended a transitional period of at least three years. that's what our members have told as is necessary to make the changes to customs it systems and changes in staffing. the key thing is we do get a transitional deal and a good deal for the final status agreement after that. william bain from the british retail consortium, thank you. today, i've looked at how non—eu goods are checked, particularly the perishable once when they arrive here. it takes quite a lot of time. you have to open up the containers, open up the
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boxes, open up the packaging and inspect them. the theories that is a good deal is reached for business they say that actually there could bea they say that actually there could be a slowdown in the whole supply chain here in the uk, so there's a lot riding on these negotiations. susannah streeter at the london gateway, thank you. now let's look at the weather with phil avery. it's not a bad afternoon across the british isles before so it didn't start that way. if you started close to that weather system as it gradually tried to wake its way into the north sea your morning look anything like this at all. tha nkfully anything like this at all. thankfully the system is on the move, dragging the worst of its conditions even in places away from the eastern shores. this was taken at seahouses earlier this morning on the northumberland coast. you can see there was still a legacy of cloud to be had awhile ago across parts of east anglia and the
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south—east. we're not quite done with the cloudy story because on through the afternoon we'll find increasing amounts of cloud bringing the threat of rain in the parts of northern ireland. having said that there is a lot of fine and dry weather to be had, say for the northern isles of scotland, still stuck with a combination of wet and windy fair. with a bit of sunshine the breeze and south—west and not too much of that, certainly through central and eastern parts, it will feel very pleasant indeed for late september. top temperature around 20 degrees or so. make the most of it. because through the course of the evening and overnight we begin to push this next band of cloud and wind and rain in through northern ireland, then it will begin to affect the western side of scotland, down through the west of england, through wales as well. all the cloud and breeze coming into the south will help to keep the temperature is up will help to keep the temperature is up but it doesn't make for a pleasa nt up but it doesn't make for a pleasant combination for the dow friday. slow progress on the weather front but progress nonetheless. no issues with flooding. by the skies
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following on behind with a peppering of pretty sparky showers across the western side of scotland, down into northern ireland. top temperature around 20. saturday starts on a pleasing note, but all the while the cloud and rain begins to fill in across northern ireland and then gets a cross across northern ireland and then gets across the irish sea to parts of scotland, the north—west of england, back into the western fringes of england and wales cricket board the further east you are the better your day will be and it's an enormous but, with a lot of uncertainty it has research, a big area of low pressure driving by the clu bs a cross area of low pressure driving by the clubs across the british isles, lots of isobars reinforced by the re m na nts of of isobars reinforced by the remnants of the hurricanes we've been talking about from the atlantic. sunday will be a stormy day, the potential for disruption atlantic. sunday will be a stormy day, the potentialfor disruption to travel. keep tuned to the forecast. this is bbc news.
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the headlines at 3pm: ryanair is threatened with legal action for misleading passengers about their rights — as thousands more flights are cancelled. imean, i mean, it's just i mean, it'sjust crazy, isn't it? how can they be so disorganised? it's ridiculous. the eu's lead negotiator says there's a new dynamic to brexit talks, but warns there's still work to be done. we managed to create clarity on some points, on others, however, more work remains to be done and we are not there yet. the england cricketer ben stokes apologises, at least 14 rohingya refugees have
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